News

Debra Oswald and Richard Glover’s super 70s giveaway

2020-02-27T17:02:34+10:00Categories: Giveaway, News|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

We're living in the 70s
Thanks to Penguin Books and Harper Collins, Word of Mouth TV has a super 70s giveaway to celebrate the season finale with one of Australia's most talented literary couples, Debra Oswald and Richard Glover. Their books The Whole Bright Year and The Land Before Avocado will take those of us who remember it on a rollicking romp back in time to Australia in the 1970s - few better times to be. And for those so careless as to be born post-1980, they will take you to a place of wonder that defies belief - a foreign land. You know the drill! Don't forget the hashtags!

The history of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol

2019-12-16T21:40:13+10:00Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , , |

Kate's novel biographies
A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens was published 176 years ago, on December 19th 1843, but its popularity only continues to grow with a new generation of movies including The Man Who Invented Christmas two years ago. It’s one of my own personal favourites of his works, simply because of its vitality and Dickens’ signature mix of joyousness and poignancy. I like to re-read every year at Christmas – it only takes an hour or so, with a glass or two of mulled mead and perhaps a thick wedge of fruit cake.

Miss Havisham’s cake – one scene never to be unseen

2020-02-08T09:24:39+10:00Categories: News|Tags: , , |

Iconic literary food moments
Charles Dickens' ability to paint a picture with words is perhaps unmatched in literature. From Magwitch swimming in the muddy Thames in Great Expectations, to the rolling London fogs in Bleak House, and the ghosts of Christmas past, present and future, in A Christmas Carol, the reader is thoroughly immersed in Dickens' England. But perhaps the most unforgettable Dickens scene is that of Miss Havisham's bridal cake in Great Expectations - a torrid, insect infested, decaying mass that mirrors the mired, rotting soul of its would-be bride. Once seen, never unseen.

Christine Wells’ quest for exquisite food moments

2019-07-22T22:16:58+10:00Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Author Q&A
Christine Wells, author of The Juliet Code, shares her obsession with dangerous women and the French Resistance with Word of Mouth TV. Set in wartime France when rations were in place, Christine hones in on the delicacies - all the items that weren't available, such as coffee - and relays the exquisite delight her characters experience when they sample their favourite rare fare. For Christine, the physical memory of a food can be one of the most powerful food experiences, which perhaps explains why she is going "retro" for her death-bed meal.

Straight from the authors’ mouths

2019-07-04T15:25:30+10:00Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Recommended reads
It's raining again! Perfect reading and cooking weather, and do we have some reads for you! Feeling like curling up with some rural romance? Christine Wells recommends The Cowgirl by Australian author Anthea Hodgson. Christine read Hodgson's previous novel The Drifter , and was hooked. So get your reading gear on, a bar of chocolate, and maybe some tissues, and enjoy this wonderful winter's offering - six recommendations in all.

Ian Fleming’s legendary Bond vodka martini

2019-07-04T18:35:56+10:00Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Iconic literary food moments
"Shaken not stirred". How many people have heard these three immortal words from Ian Fleming's James Bond novels? They speak of adventure, danger, sex, snobbery, desire, pleasure, daring, free rein, humour, fun and elitism, just to name a few. And when it comes to literary food moments, they may well top the lot in terms of sheer international recognition. Yet it is only one of the many food references that Fleming scatters through his Bond novels, a fact that has caused many reviewers to cast Commander Bond as the foodie prototype.

The Juliet Code – by Christine Wells

2019-06-30T16:48:07+10:00Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Kate's review
Australian author Christine Wells has been making a name for herself writing intelligent, suspenseful historical novels. Her latest offering, The Juliet Code, begins in 1947 when a young woman named Juliet Barnard is being interrogated about her role as an undercover wireless operator for the Allies in Nazi-occupied France during the war. She is wracked with guilt and remorse over the disappearance of a friend and colleague of hers, and so agrees to help her friend’s brother track down what happened to her. Her bravery, resolution, and quick wits prove to be more valuable than strength and ruthlessness.

C.S. Lewis’s oh-so tempting Turkish delight

2019-04-22T14:43:29+10:00Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , , |

Iconic literary food moments
One of the most powerful iconic food moments in literature is in C.S. Lewis's children's book The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. It is the moment in which Edward betrays his family, even his own soul, in return for the addictive Turkish delight offered him by the White Witch. I read this when I was seven, and have never forgotten it. They say the strongest memories are attached to the greatest emotion, and this was my first taste of betrayal.

The Desert Nurse – Pamela Hart

2019-04-15T16:29:59+10:00Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , , , |

Kate's review
I’m a big fan of Pamela Hart’s vivid and intelligent historical romances. They give me everything I want in a book – drama, heartache, struggle, triumph, and an enthralling glimpse into the past that teaches me something I did not know. The Desert Nurse is set mainly in Egypt during the World War 1, and tells the story of a young woman named Evelyn Northey who is determined to become a doctor, despite all the obstacles in her way.

Straight from the authors’ mouths

2019-04-15T16:29:23+10:00Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Recommended reads
Word of Mouth TV has three more great Australian novels to recommend this month, and three new cookbooks. Pamela Hart kicks off with The Lighthouse at Pelican Rock, a book written by none other than her husband Stephen Hart - his debut novel. But Pamela swears she is not recommending it just because Stephen wrote it. She edited the book as well, so it is, indeed, etched into her heart, excuse the pun. "Everytime I read it, I forgot to edit it," she says. "It just sucked me in all over again."

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