SarahM

About SarahM

This author has not yet filled in any details.
So far SarahM has created 116 blog entries.

The history of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol

2019-12-16T21:40:13+11:00Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , , |

Kate's novel biographies
A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens was published 176 years ago, on December 19th 1843, but its popularity only continues to grow with a new generation of movies including The Man Who Invented Christmas two years ago. It’s one of my own personal favourites of his works, simply because of its vitality and Dickens’ signature mix of joyousness and poignancy. I like to re-read every year at Christmas – it only takes an hour or so, with a glass or two of mulled mead and perhaps a thick wedge of fruit cake.

Miss Havisham’s cake – one scene never to be unseen

2019-12-13T15:31:47+11:00Categories: News|Tags: , , |

Iconic literary food moments
Charles Dickens' ability to paint a picture with words is perhaps unmatched in literature. From Magwitch swimming in the muddy Thames in Great Expectations, to the rolling London fogs in Bleak House, and the ghosts of Christmas past, present and future, in A Christmas Carol, the reader is thoroughly immersed in Dickens' England. But perhaps the most unforgettable Dickens scene is that of Miss Havisham's bridal cake in Great Expectations - a torrid, insect infested, decaying mass that mirrors the mired, rotting soul of its would-be bride. Once seen, never unseen.

Episode 13: Dickens Boz in Oz Christmas special

2019-12-13T15:33:45+11:00Categories: Episodes|Tags: , , , , , , |

Word of Mouth TV tags along for the Boz in Oz conference and discovers Charles Dickens’ great association with Australia. Of course, few authors conjure Christmas more readily than Dickens. Join us as we explore the mystery of the Dickens statue in Sydney’s Centennial Park, and interview some of Australia’s leading authorities on Dickens before gathering for a Dickensian feast at the beautiful historic Vaucluse House. As author of the classic Christmas novel The Christmas Carol, our Boz in Oz special seemed the perfect choice to celebrate the Christmas season. Enjoy!

Charles Dickens Boz in Oz Christmas giveaway

2019-12-11T15:58:46+11:00Categories: Giveaway|Tags: , , , , , |

It's the works!
Thanks to Penguin Random House, Word of Mouth TV has a great Dickens book pack to give away for our special Christmas edition. What’s in the box? Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings, Oliver Twist, A Tale of Two Cities, Bleak House and Hard Times. What a fantastic way to get into the Christmas spirit. All you need to do to enter is SUBSCRIBE to our Youtube channel, or our website www.wordofmouthtv.com.au, then SHARE on social media using the hashtags #WordofMouthTV #BozInOz and tell the world why Word of Mouth TV is the freshest, hottest cooking and book show ever!

Christine Wells’ quest for exquisite food moments

2019-07-22T22:16:58+11:00Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Author Q&A
Christine Wells, author of The Juliet Code, shares her obsession with dangerous women and the French Resistance with Word of Mouth TV. Set in wartime France when rations were in place, Christine hones in on the delicacies - all the items that weren't available, such as coffee - and relays the exquisite delight her characters experience when they sample their favourite rare fare. For Christine, the physical memory of a food can be one of the most powerful food experiences, which perhaps explains why she is going "retro" for her death-bed meal.

Ian Fleming’s Bond beauty Bearnaise sauce

2019-07-05T14:50:22+11:00Categories: Recipes|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Iconic literary food moments
"Shaken not stirred". How many people have heard these three immortal words from Ian Fleming's James Bond novels? They speak of adventure, danger, sex, snobbery, desire, pleasure, daring, free rein, humour, fun and elitism, just to name a few. And when it comes to literary food moments, they may well top the lot in terms of sheer international recognition. Yet it is only one of the many food references that Fleming scatters through his Bond novels, a fact that has caused many reviewers to cast Commander Bond as the foodie prototype.

Christine Wells’ perfect picnic quiche

2019-07-05T14:44:08+11:00Categories: Recipes|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Portrait of a recipe
Christine Wells' novel The Juliet Code is set in wartime France, a period when everyone was on rations and food was hard to come by. It also features a picnic. That made your standard lavish meal a tad unsuitable. So after cracking our heads we settled upon a quiche because you can make quiche out of just about any leftovers in the fridge (which is great when you are short of food), it's French, it's easy, and it's perfect for a picnic. Enjoy!

Straight from the authors’ mouths

2019-07-04T15:25:30+11:00Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Recommended reads
It's raining again! Perfect reading and cooking weather, and do we have some reads for you! Feeling like curling up with some rural romance? Christine Wells recommends The Cowgirl by Australian author Anthea Hodgson. Christine read Hodgson's previous novel The Drifter , and was hooked. So get your reading gear on, a bar of chocolate, and maybe some tissues, and enjoy this wonderful winter's offering - six recommendations in all.

Ian Fleming’s legendary Bond vodka martini

2019-07-04T18:35:56+11:00Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Iconic literary food moments
"Shaken not stirred". How many people have heard these three immortal words from Ian Fleming's James Bond novels? They speak of adventure, danger, sex, snobbery, desire, pleasure, daring, free rein, humour, fun and elitism, just to name a few. And when it comes to literary food moments, they may well top the lot in terms of sheer international recognition. Yet it is only one of the many food references that Fleming scatters through his Bond novels, a fact that has caused many reviewers to cast Commander Bond as the foodie prototype.

The Juliet Code – by Christine Wells

2019-06-30T16:48:07+11:00Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Kate's review
Australian author Christine Wells has been making a name for herself writing intelligent, suspenseful historical novels. Her latest offering, The Juliet Code, begins in 1947 when a young woman named Juliet Barnard is being interrogated about her role as an undercover wireless operator for the Allies in Nazi-occupied France during the war. She is wracked with guilt and remorse over the disappearance of a friend and colleague of hers, and so agrees to help her friend’s brother track down what happened to her. Her bravery, resolution, and quick wits prove to be more valuable than strength and ruthlessness.

Load More Posts