Word of Mouth TV

Christine Wells’ quest for exquisite food moments

2019-07-22T22:16:58+10:00Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Author Q&A
Christine Wells, author of The Juliet Code, shares her obsession with dangerous women and the French Resistance with Word of Mouth TV. Set in wartime France when rations were in place, Christine hones in on the delicacies - all the items that weren't available, such as coffee - and relays the exquisite delight her characters experience when they sample their favourite rare fare. For Christine, the physical memory of a food can be one of the most powerful food experiences, which perhaps explains why she is going "retro" for her death-bed meal.

Ian Fleming’s Bond beauty Bearnaise sauce

2019-07-05T14:50:22+10:00Categories: Recipes|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Iconic literary food moments
"Shaken not stirred". How many people have heard these three immortal words from Ian Fleming's James Bond novels? They speak of adventure, danger, sex, snobbery, desire, pleasure, daring, free rein, humour, fun and elitism, just to name a few. And when it comes to literary food moments, they may well top the lot in terms of sheer international recognition. Yet it is only one of the many food references that Fleming scatters through his Bond novels, a fact that has caused many reviewers to cast Commander Bond as the foodie prototype.

Straight from the authors’ mouths

2019-07-04T15:25:30+10:00Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Recommended reads
It's raining again! Perfect reading and cooking weather, and do we have some reads for you! Feeling like curling up with some rural romance? Christine Wells recommends The Cowgirl by Australian author Anthea Hodgson. Christine read Hodgson's previous novel The Drifter , and was hooked. So get your reading gear on, a bar of chocolate, and maybe some tissues, and enjoy this wonderful winter's offering - six recommendations in all.

Ian Fleming’s legendary Bond vodka martini

2019-07-04T18:35:56+10:00Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Iconic literary food moments
"Shaken not stirred". How many people have heard these three immortal words from Ian Fleming's James Bond novels? They speak of adventure, danger, sex, snobbery, desire, pleasure, daring, free rein, humour, fun and elitism, just to name a few. And when it comes to literary food moments, they may well top the lot in terms of sheer international recognition. Yet it is only one of the many food references that Fleming scatters through his Bond novels, a fact that has caused many reviewers to cast Commander Bond as the foodie prototype.

The Juliet Code – by Christine Wells

2019-06-30T16:48:07+10:00Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Kate's review
Australian author Christine Wells has been making a name for herself writing intelligent, suspenseful historical novels. Her latest offering, The Juliet Code, begins in 1947 when a young woman named Juliet Barnard is being interrogated about her role as an undercover wireless operator for the Allies in Nazi-occupied France during the war. She is wracked with guilt and remorse over the disappearance of a friend and colleague of hers, and so agrees to help her friend’s brother track down what happened to her. Her bravery, resolution, and quick wits prove to be more valuable than strength and ruthlessness.

C.S. Lewis’s oh-so tempting Turkish delight

2019-04-22T14:43:29+10:00Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , , |

Iconic literary food moments
One of the most powerful iconic food moments in literature is in C.S. Lewis's children's book The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. It is the moment in which Edward betrays his family, even his own soul, in return for the addictive Turkish delight offered him by the White Witch. I read this when I was seven, and have never forgotten it. They say the strongest memories are attached to the greatest emotion, and this was my first taste of betrayal.

The Desert Nurse – Pamela Hart

2019-04-15T16:29:59+10:00Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , , , |

Kate's review
I’m a big fan of Pamela Hart’s vivid and intelligent historical romances. They give me everything I want in a book – drama, heartache, struggle, triumph, and an enthralling glimpse into the past that teaches me something I did not know. The Desert Nurse is set mainly in Egypt during the World War 1, and tells the story of a young woman named Evelyn Northey who is determined to become a doctor, despite all the obstacles in her way.

Straight from the authors’ mouths

2019-04-15T16:29:23+10:00Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Recommended reads
Word of Mouth TV has three more great Australian novels to recommend this month, and three new cookbooks. Pamela Hart kicks off with The Lighthouse at Pelican Rock, a book written by none other than her husband Stephen Hart - his debut novel. But Pamela swears she is not recommending it just because Stephen wrote it. She edited the book as well, so it is, indeed, etched into her heart, excuse the pun. "Everytime I read it, I forgot to edit it," she says. "It just sucked me in all over again."

ANZAC biscuits – the commemorative cookie

2019-04-24T09:18:08+10:00Categories: Recipes|Tags: , , , , , , |

History of a humble cookie
ANZAC Day is nearly upon us and we couldn't resist just popping up a quick ANZAC biscuit recipe. The idea of lounging around with a cup of tea, reading Pamela Hart's The Desert Nurse and nibbling on freshly baked ANZAC cookies was impossible to resist. My paternal grandmother was a magnificent cook and worked in Brisbane's iconic Breakfast Creek Hotel back in its hey day. She would bake ANZAC cookies all year around and they were a family favourite. So I did a bit of research on the birth of the ANZAC cookie and it appears those upstart Kiwis are trying to claim it as their own.

Pamela Hart’s lovely slow-cooked Egyptian lamb

2019-05-21T10:53:41+10:00Categories: Recipes|Tags: , , , , , , , |

Portrait of a recipe
To celebrate Pamela Hart's fabulous war-time setting in North Africa, we settled upon this absolutely delicious roast lamb in pomegranate molasses with flatbread. Lamb is, of course, typical Mediterranean fare in both Europe and Africa, which made it the perfect meal over which to discuss The Desert Nurse. This dish was surprisingly simple and really packed some bang for buck. It's great for crowds and family weekends and would be perfect fare for an ANZAC weekend.

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