food

Ian Fleming’s Bond beauty Bearnaise sauce

2019-07-05T14:50:22+00:00 Categories: Recipes|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Iconic literary food moments
"Shaken not stirred". How many people have heard these three immortal words from Ian Fleming's James Bond novels? They speak of adventure, danger, sex, snobbery, desire, pleasure, daring, free rein, humour, fun and elitism, just to name a few. And when it comes to literary food moments, they may well top the lot in terms of sheer international recognition. Yet it is only one of the many food references that Fleming scatters through his Bond novels, a fact that has caused many reviewers to cast Commander Bond as the foodie prototype.

Christine Wells’ perfect picnic quiche

2019-07-05T14:44:08+00:00 Categories: Recipes|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Portrait of a recipe
Christine Wells' novel The Juliet Code is set in wartime France, a period when everyone was on rations and food was hard to come by. It also features a picnic. That made your standard lavish meal a tad unsuitable. So after cracking our heads we settled upon a quiche because you can make quiche out of just about any leftovers in the fridge (which is great when you are short of food), it's French, it's easy, and it's perfect for a picnic. Enjoy!

Ian Fleming’s legendary Bond vodka martini

2019-07-04T18:35:56+00:00 Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Iconic literary food moments
"Shaken not stirred". How many people have heard these three immortal words from Ian Fleming's James Bond novels? They speak of adventure, danger, sex, snobbery, desire, pleasure, daring, free rein, humour, fun and elitism, just to name a few. And when it comes to literary food moments, they may well top the lot in terms of sheer international recognition. Yet it is only one of the many food references that Fleming scatters through his Bond novels, a fact that has caused many reviewers to cast Commander Bond as the foodie prototype.

The Juliet Code – by Christine Wells

2019-06-30T16:48:07+00:00 Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Kate's review
Australian author Christine Wells has been making a name for herself writing intelligent, suspenseful historical novels. Her latest offering, The Juliet Code, begins in 1947 when a young woman named Juliet Barnard is being interrogated about her role as an undercover wireless operator for the Allies in Nazi-occupied France during the war. She is wracked with guilt and remorse over the disappearance of a friend and colleague of hers, and so agrees to help her friend’s brother track down what happened to her. Her bravery, resolution, and quick wits prove to be more valuable than strength and ruthlessness.

Episode 12 – Christine Wells – The Juliet Code

2019-07-05T15:09:43+00:00 Categories: Episodes|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Join us as we interview Christine Wells about her spy thriller romance The Juliet Code set in World War II France. Female spies have always held an exotic fascination for readers - think Mata Hari, Australia's Nancy Wake or Marvel's fictional Black Widow. Perhaps this fascination emerges from the sharp contrast between the courage involved and the relative physical frailty and social vulnerability of women. On so many counts, the female is outmatched - except for her intelligence and wit of course. And her main ally is the fact that she is constantly underestimated.

Christine Wells’ super spy thriller giveaway

2019-06-28T15:48:38+00:00 Categories: Giveaway|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

The Juliet Code
Thanks to publisher Penguin Random House and authors Kate Forsyth and S.L. Mills, Word of Mouth TV has two more book packs to give away this week for our special Kids & YA Festival edition. If you love a good spy thriller, this ones for you. Based on the escapades of real-life female spies from World War II, The Juliet Code has a wonderful ring of authenticity and is a reminder of the many and varied, not to mention courageous roles that women have played throughout throughout history. And let's not forget the adventure and romance ...!

The Desert Nurse – Pamela Hart

2019-04-15T16:29:59+00:00 Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , , , |

Kate's review
I’m a big fan of Pamela Hart’s vivid and intelligent historical romances. They give me everything I want in a book – drama, heartache, struggle, triumph, and an enthralling glimpse into the past that teaches me something I did not know. The Desert Nurse is set mainly in Egypt during the World War 1, and tells the story of a young woman named Evelyn Northey who is determined to become a doctor, despite all the obstacles in her way.

ANZAC biscuits – the commemorative cookie

2019-04-24T09:18:08+00:00 Categories: Recipes|Tags: , , , , , , |

History of a humble cookie
ANZAC Day is nearly upon us and we couldn't resist just popping up a quick ANZAC biscuit recipe. The idea of lounging around with a cup of tea, reading Pamela Hart's The Desert Nurse and nibbling on freshly baked ANZAC cookies was impossible to resist. My paternal grandmother was a magnificent cook and worked in Brisbane's iconic Breakfast Creek Hotel back in its hey day. She would bake ANZAC cookies all year around and they were a family favourite. So I did a bit of research on the birth of the ANZAC cookie and it appears those upstart Kiwis are trying to claim it as their own.

Pamela Hart’s love of food, words and the chip butty

2019-04-15T16:40:16+00:00 Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Author Q&A
Pamela Hart says the most difficult part of writing the The Desert Nurse was recording the endless stream of casualties from Gallipoli in a manner that wouldn't overwhelm the reader. Pamela is a research-heavy author and food also plays a key role in her novels. The Country Women's Association cookbooks are her go-to references for the food of the times. She also has a soft spot for Margaret Fulton and the chip butty.

One Enchanted Evening – Charlotte Smith

2019-02-09T23:09:29+00:00 Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , , , |

Kate's review
In 2004, Charlotte Smith inherited more than 3,000 vintage couture gowns from her Quaker godmother, Doris Darnell, who had spent a lifetime gathering her collection, which spanned 250 years of fashion. Every single piece had been given to her, by friends who knew of her passion and by strangers who wanted their old and precious clothes to be properly cared for. Doris Darnell also bequeathed her god-daughter her notebooks, which detailed the history of each item. She described these histories as "fascinating stories, sometimes full of joy, other times grief, sometimes bitterness, other times heartache."

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